Small business credit - what happened to the Phase 2 credit protection reforms agreed at COAG in 2008?

In 2008, the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) agreed to a two phase reform process for the regulation of credit and that in Phase Two the Commonwealth would consider the need to change the definition of regulated credit, and to address practices and forms of contracts that were not subject to the Credit Act.

After lengthy consultation, on 21 December 2012, the Minister for Financial Services and Superannuation, Bill Shorten, released for public consultation draft legislation to address perceived gaps in existing credit regulation and enforcement. 

"A review of the provision of credit to small business has shown that, while the majority of small business lenders and brokers provide a valuable service, some practices exist that result in high financial losses to small business borrowers. The draft legislation seeks to strengthen protections for small business borrowers, particular where the loan in secured against the family home, including by extending the Australian Securities and Investments Commission’s supervision and enforcement ability.

While difficult to quantify the costs and benefits, some lenders will incur additional one-off implementation costs. Most lenders will not incur these costs as they already comply (or can readily comply) with the proposed changes.  Borrowers, particularly those which have exhausted mainstream alternatives, may find it more difficult and costly to obtain credit but will have access to redress if misconduct occurs.

The Regulation Impact Statement was prepared by the Treasury and assessed as adequate by the Office of Best Practice Regulation."


Treasury Update, October 2014 (K&L Gates)

Due to the government moratorium on legislation awaiting the findings of the Financial System Inquiry, Treasury is not currently pursuing Phase 2 of the credit reforms concerning small business and investment lending.


Regulation Impact Statement: Small business credit, January 2013 

This Regulatory Impact Statement (RIS) considers whether credit provided to small business should be regulated, as part of the National Credit Reforms. 

Executive Summary 

The provision of credit to small businesses can assist them to meet their start up, expansion or ongoing business cost requirements. A review of the sector suggests that the majority of small business lenders and brokers operate in a way that provides a valuable service to their borrowers. However, some practices exist in the industry that can result in high levels of financial losses to individual small business borrowers.

These practices primarily occur in relation to ‘distressed’ small business borrowers, that is, borrowers who are in a position where they are seeking funds urgently to keep their business afloat (rather than, for example, wanting credit to expand their business). The most common scenario is where the business has defaulted in the repayments under an existing loan, and that lender has either commenced enforcement action or is threatening to do so.

The current legislative framework does not adequately address these practices. The possibility of enforcement activity by the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) that would comprehensively address is subject to limitations including a combination of regulatory and enforcement gaps and the prohibitive cost and inefficiency of enforcement action. There are also substantial barriers to recovering compensable losses, both in actions taken by ASIC and by consumers in their own right.

It is recognised that small businesses cannot be absolved of all responsibility for their financial and business decisions, and a balance should be reached between protecting the most vulnerable and allowing the market to price risk. To achieve this balance, it is proposed to introduce targeted regulation which will minimise as far as possible the impact on lenders who are not engaging in these practices.

Targeted regulation would be introduced through a negative licensing scheme, improved disclosure requirements, universal access to external dispute resolution (EDR) and the introduction of a remedy for asset-stripping conduct. This approach is influenced by the extent to which lenders and brokers are largely already members of an EDR scheme and also hold an Australian credit licence (limiting the impact on these persons).

Were this not the case a different approach would need to be considered. These reforms will improve ASIC’s supervision and enforcement ability and give ASIC the ability to exclude entities from the market in the event of severe misconduct. They will also assist consumers by giving them access to more affordable dispute resolution, and result in improved understanding of the loan contract in some cases. 

The reforms are not expected to comprehensively address this type of misconduct in the small business lending market, but are expected to have a deterrent effect on some lenders. Borrowers will have improved access to compensation if misconduct occurs, and ASIC will have improved ability to identify and exclude lenders where, for example, they demonstrate a continued reluctance to comply with the law. 

It is difficult to quantify the cost to industry and the benefits to borrowers (and there is difficulty in observing and quantifying any flow on consequences), and it is not possible to state definitively whether or not this reform would have a net benefit in monetary terms. Costs to all small business lenders will include one off implementation costs to change disclosure procedures and modify other practices to address regulatory risk. Most lenders would not need to make substantial changes as they are already complying with, or are in a position to readily comply with the reforms. Nevertheless, the reforms propose addressing this conduct in a way that may have impacts on all borrowers, primarily through the risk of higher costs or some lenders exiting the market. 

Overall, it is considered the reforms balance the need to protect borrowers while minimising as far as possible the costs to industry, and have the potential to reduce significant losses to individual businesses.