RBA

Invoice trading is booming in Australia, according to a report by KMPG, University of Sydney, Cambridge University and Tsinghua Graduate School

As reported in The Australian today, in the first Asia-Pacific report surveying Alternative Finance published this week, it is notable that, relative to consumer lending, alternative business finance and, in particular invoice trading, has developed much more strongly in Australia than in the US and the UK.

We are quoted in the article as noting that this underlines the exceptionally under-served nature of the Australian small business lending market, which at the recent Altfi Summit in Sydney was estimated to be seeking an additional $95bn of finance.

This trend is also reflected in RBA lending statistics which show property loans since the GFC have grown by $538.7bn (+54%) while business lending has increased by just $72.5bn (+9%).

(RBA Statistics: Business Credit Seasonally Adjusted: $765.5bn in December 2008 to $838.0bn; Housing Credit (Owner Occupied and Investor) $992.9bn to $1,531.6bn)

KPMG’s endorsement of invoice trading will go a long way, but regulation is what really builds trust in a sector. The truth is, unlike consumer lending, a sandbox won’t accelerate the development of innovative new business finance products – but increased involvement from and endorsement by the gamekeeper will accelerate business adoption.

The government’s most pressing need now is to accelerate the adoption of alternative finance by SMEs, which would provide a kick-start to our economic growth. Introducing disclosure standards as to the cost of finance and terms and conditions of finance – similar to comparison rates for mortgages – is a simple step to take, but would dramatically change the reputation of the sector.

It’s clear that the regulatory environment needs a 21st century approach, and the government seems to be aware of this, but we are all waiting to see words turn into action. We’re in a similar position to when the SMSF market first emerged – the regulators had to rapidly come up with a new approach then, and the need is even more pressing now with the increased speed of the development of new business finance products.

As Paul Keating said: “When we laid the foundations for the current superannuation system in the 1991 Budget, I never expected Self Managed Super Funds (SMSFs) to become the largest segment of super. They were almost an afterthought added to the legislation as a replacement for defined benefit schemes.” 

Time to get wriggle on!

  

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Why SME lending doesn't make sense for our banks, according to the RBA

It's time that our banks started to be upfront about lending to small businesses. It doesn't make any sense for them and they only do it to access cheap deposits.

The Reserve Bank of Australia issued an interesting report in October 2015, the main focus being on leveling the playing field in residential mortgages between the Big 5 banks and the smaller ones.

However, it also succinctly highlighted why SME lending is so unattractive for our banks. They need 4 times more of their own capital to lend to a small business than the amount required to advance a residential mortgage loan. Add in the costs of dealing with the complexity of business lending and it is clear why it is such an unattractive business for them.

And with the looming regulatory capital changes ahead, SME lending is going to become a lot less attractive: up to 10 times less in fact.

Thankfully, the Alternative Finance market is now developing but, if not actively supported by our policy-makers,  it will take too much time to plug the gap that really needs filling now, not in 5 years time.

Let's hope Canberra is on to this.